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Four useful websites for pediatric physiotherapists

by Rikke Damkjær Moen - Physiotherapist and Medical Manager on July 18

Staying up to date in the world of pediatric physiotherapy and disabilities is crucial. Here are four resources that will keep you updated on best available evidence.

1. Pediatric Physical Therapy

The official pediatrics journal of APTA, Pediatric Physical Therapy, publishes articles, research and case reports on topics such as early intervention, neonatology, pediatric sports and fitness.

The journal is published four times a year and must be purchased, with the exception of a few free articles that comes with every issue.


We especially like the journal’s podcast, which is free and ready to download to your phone or computer. This is a great way to catch up on the latest while working out or commuting to work. Smart and convenient.

 

2. Cerebral Palsy Foundation

Cerebral Palsy Foundation is an American organisation that focuses, as you might take from the name, on cerebral palsy (CP). As of today, it’s the largest non-government funder of CP research in the US.

You’ll find the latest news from the world of CP research, a video library with insights from experts and thought leaders, as well as useful fact sheets that are excellent to scroll through.

Read also: 5 reliable websites for parents of children with cerebral palsy

Andri, april 2016-2.jpg

 

3. Cerebral Palsy Alliance

Cerebral Palsy Alliance is an Australian organisation that aims to help people with CP, regardless of age, to live a comfortable, independent and inclusive life.

The organisation originally started off as The Spastic Centre of New South Wales in 1945 and was the first of its kind in the world.


As you’re probably aware of, Australia is renowned for its quality research within CP, so staying up to date on what’s happening “down under” is a good idea!


There are articles and news on interventions, therapies and research. You’ll also find high-quality videos if you prefer visual learning.


A favourite of ours is the stories section with cases and interviews, which can be a great source of inspiration for your own work.


You can also sign up to get weekly news updates on the latest research.

 

4. CanChild

CanChild is a Canadian non-profit research and educational centre. Unlike Cerebral Palsy Alliance, CanChild also set the spotlight on other diagnoses, such as autism, down syndrome and developmental coordination disorder.

The diagnosis and resources sections might be the most interesting for you as a professional.


In the diagnosis section, you can go through a vast amount of themes and research areas concerning children and youth with developmental conditions.


At the resources section, you’ll find reports and tools generated by CanChild’s research, including a comprehensive resource on Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). If you prefer visual learning, there are videos and webinars available too.


Last but not least, CanChild offers a newsletter that will drop in your inbox on a regular basis. All in all, CanChild is a pretty complete resource that covers a vast amount of diagnosis, as well as news and research.


We hope this list will inspire and support you in the work of keeping up to date on the latest research.


Happy researching!

Sara with the rare syndrome CDG1a

Rikke Damkjær Moen - Physiotherapist and Medical Manager
Rikke Damkjær Moen brings many years of experience as clinical physiotherapist to the Made for Movement team. Her mission is to ensure that everybody, regardless of mobility problems, should be able to experience the joy and health benefits of physical activity. As our Medical Manager, Rikke is passionate about sharing knowledge so that individuals with special needs, families, and clinicians can discover the possibilities and solutions provided by Made for Movement.

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